Fresca: li Frascarelli

Frascarelli is one of our most famous regional dish and one of those that best represents the peasant and rustic cuisine of Le Marche. Allegedly the name seems to stem from its original method of preparation, which consisted of splashing water on flour scattered on the pastry board with a twig, called in our dialect frasca from which derives the word frascarelli. Nevertheless this is a super old method of preparation and my grandmother would never allow me to cook with a twig nowadays. When I told her that I wanted to learn how to make frascarelli she looked at me a bit puzzled: “why on earth have you even thought about it?”. As this question might suggest a) my grandmother does not like frascarelli and b) they are not prepared that often in my house. I don’t know the exact reasons why they aren’t as appreciated as they used to be back in the days, but I reckon it has to do with the fact that it tastes cheap, it smell like hardship and it reminds my grandparents the fact that they had to eat it three or four times a week as they could not afford anything but flour and water: the two main ingredients of this recipe. This sort of fake polentaflour mush- was in fact called frascarelli pe li poritti frascarelli for the poor people- and it used to taste like glue when they could not even afford to buy cheese for the topping. A more tasty kind of frascarelli is frascarelli de riso corgo (coricato),which is a recipe more in vogue in the province of Macerata and involved the addition of rice. When my grandmother agreed to teach me how to make frascarelli shealso said: “let’s do it, but I am only making frascarelli de li signori“; this used to be the frascareli eaten only by rich people as it involved the addition of eggs in the mixture and a tasty relish as topping. There are plenty of recipes on the web and most of these claim to be the real and original one; remember there is nothing as such, for any dish  every province, every town and every family will have a different recipe. Hence this is my family version of  frascarelli.

Ingredient for 4 people

  • 500 gr. of flour
  • 3 eggs

On a pastry board break and whisk the eggs, then gradually add the flour. However, you won’t be mixing the flour to the eggs as if you want to make a soft phyllo dough, but you will be mixing the two ingredients and simoultaneously crumble the dough into small grains, as if you are trying to remove some liquid glue from your hands by rubbing them, and then making them smaller with the aid of a knife.

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Once this mix is ready, boil and salt some water and start to slowly place the frascarelli into the pan. There is a specific movent to do so, which I don’t even know if it is necessary or not but I reckon it helps the frascarelli to cook more homogenously.  As the pictures below shows, you will have to throw the mix of flour and eggs into the water as if you are sieving it through your fingers and with the other hands quickly and constantly stir it into the hot water.After max 5 minutes of continuous stirring the frascarelli will be ready; as shown below this should be a liquid mix, but not as liquid as a soup as the small piece of flour and eggs will be cooked.

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If you want to try and make frascarelli with rice,  the method of preparation does not change much; before adding the mix of flour and eggs cook the rice for 8/10 minutes and when is half cooked add the frascarelli as explained above. Go crazy with the topping, the day me and my grandmother made it, we decided to simply grate some Parmesanon top and add some fresh sausage separetely cooked. Nevertheless, you could top it with tomato sauce, ragù sauce, meatballs, wild boar sauce; really be creative as much as you wish for the topping  you palate will appreciate it.

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